A May Day Tradition

Remember sharing May Day baskets as a child?

The tradition derives from the ancient holiday, Beltane, also known as May Eve, May Day, and Walpurgis Night, on the eve or first day of May.
It celebrates the height of Spring and the flowering of life. Now is the time to wear bright colors and flowers in your hair. Light a fire and dance in the warmth of the new season.

The fun and excitement with may baskets in addition to the craft derived from having to place in secret without getting caught – making it an engaging lesson for young ones in good will and charity.

In honor of this season of new growth and prosperity and prepare a “tussie mussie” or May basket by filling it with flowers and goodwill and then give it to someone in need of healing and caring, such as a shut-in or elderly friend.

According to Seasons of Witchcraft, by Ellen Dugan, some styles of tussie mussies include:

  • A Hand Tied Bouquet – a traditional European method of holding a small bunch of flowers in your hand and tying together tightly with a ribbon.
  • The Beidermeier – a dome shaped bouquet with larger flowers in the middle with smaller blooms arranged in concentric circles
  • Monochromatic Hand-Tied Bouquet – popular for weddings (tis the season!), mixing and matching a variety of blooms with similar colors.